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  • THE LADYKILLERSFebruary 2017
  • THE VICAR OF DIBLEYMay 2016
  • AN ENGLISHMAN ABROAD/STILL LIFEApril 2016
  • ROUND AND ROUND THE GARDENNovember 2015
  • LUCKY SODSSeptember 2015
  • FAWLTY TOWERSJuly 2015
  • THE HAUNTINGMay 2015
  • THE 39 STEPSMay 2015
  • 'ALLO 'ALLOSep/Oct 2011
  • DEATH OF A SALESMANJan/Feb 2012
  • THE BEAUTY QUEEN OF LEENANENov 2013
  • ALL IN GOOD TIMESep/Oct 2014
  • BLUE REMEMBERED HILLSNovember 2014
 

 

Review: Murdered to Death

Who doesn’t like an Agatha Christie whodunnit? And most people like to have a laugh, so what could be better than combining the two and creating a spoof?

Murdered To Death fits this description and is currently
being performed at Retford Little Theatre. If the first night’s performance is anything to go by, it will be well received.

The audience around me certainly enjoyed it, the laughter
so frequent and loud it sometimes drowned out the cast.

 

 

As you might expect, the setting is a 1930s country house, and the set itself left you in no doubt that was where you were. The design and build were, as ever, excellent,
dominated by a spacious lounge, but offering glimpses
of the hallway beyond as well as access to an adjoining
room and windows on the grounds outside, all of which
were used to good effect.

The tone was set in the opening moments as Sheila Eyre
and Gaby Hardwick (aunt and niece respectively) provided
a taste of the humour to come. Over the next twenty
minutes or so, we were introduced to a stream of colourful characters, ranging from the rebellious butler to the
blustering Colonel and the “jinxed” amateur sleuth.

When the detective arrives, his command of the English language (I use the phrase advisedly) only serves to increase the mayhem – and fun. Frankly, how Stephen Walker
managed to remember those lines is beyond me, but I’m
glad he did.

The pace fell just short of frenetic, which meant the story moved on rapidly, whilst ensuring the audience kept up.

Another large cast means it’s not practical to name-check
all of them, but none put a foot wrong (with apologies to
the constable for the poor taste in making that comment).

Borderline slapstick, some clever wordplay and a cast who clearly embraced the ridiculousness of the scenario, I would defy anyone to watch this without coming away with a smile on their face.

Yet again, the Little Theatre has shown that Retford is blessed with some very talented people, both on the stage and off.

 

Reviewed by Graeme Cumming

OUR NEXT PRODUCTION

The Thrill of Love
by Amanda Whittington
19th May to 27th May 2017, 7:30pm

A gripping drama about Ruth Ellis, the last woman to be hanged in Britain. A divorcee with a young child to care for, Ruth works in the kind of nightclubs where there's more than just a drink on offer. The girls work hard, play hard and dream of a movie-star life. Then she meets the wealthy, womanising David, a racing driver with whom she becomes obsessed. Fame comes but not in the way she imagines. Ruth Ellis was the last woman to be hanged in Britain, convicted of the coldblooded killing of her unfaithful lover. The Thrill of Love takes a new look at the real woman behind the headlines and at the events that drive her to murder?

Booking Tickets for The Thrill of Love
Members: 6:00-8:00pm 12/05/2017 and
10:00am-12:00 noon 13/05/2017
Non-Members: 6:00-8:00pm 15/05/2017
to 27/052017 (not Sundays)
Box Office: 01777 702002
Email:

 




Quiz Night
Friday 21st April 2017, 7:30pm

Everybody welcome! £1.00 per person, pay on entry, maximum team size of six people.

 



 

2016-2017 Season Brochure

The Season Brochure for the forthcoming 2016-2017 season of plays is now available.

Click the image on the left
to download your copy,
or complete the form on the Contact page and we'll post one to you.